HCV Can Be Cured illustration of a magnifying glass examining the Hep C virusScreening and diagnosing Hep C are the first steps to cure. Your role in supporting patients during their Hep C journey has never been more important. At-risk individuals should be screened regardless of liver enzyme levels.1-4

Cure, or sustained virologic response (SVR12), is defined as undetectable levels of HCV in the blood at 12 weeks after completion of therapy.3,5

2 steps to diagnose Hep C.

If your patient falls within the baby boomer age cohort (born 1945–1965) or a risk factor is identified3:

  1. Screen with an HCV antibody test.
  2. Confirm diagnosis with an HCV RNA test.

Select “reflex testing” at the screening step
so a confirmatory HCV RNA test will be run automatically if the antibody test is positive.

HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting the Hep C diagnostic algorithm beginning with the Hep C antibody test; if the patient tests negative with no Hep C exposure, then no additional testing is required. If a patient tests positive, follow up with an HCV RNA test to confirm chronic Hep C. If this test returns negative, then no current Hep C infection was detected. Follow up with additional testing as appropriate. If positive, Hep C is detected and the patient should either be linked to care through treatment or referral to a specialist.HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting the Hep C diagnostic algorithm beginning with the Hep C antibody test; if the patient tests negative with no Hep C exposure, then no additional testing is required. If a patient tests positive, follow up with an HCV RNA test to confirm chronic Hep C. If this test returns negative, then no current Hep C infection was detected. Follow up with additional testing as appropriate. If positive, Hep C is detected and the patient should either be linked to care through treatment or referral to a specialist.HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting the Hep C diagnostic algorithm beginning with the Hep C antibody test; if the patient tests negative with no Hep C exposure, then no additional testing is required. If a patient tests positive, follow up with an HCV RNA test to confirm chronic Hep C. If this test returns negative, then no current Hep C infection was detected. Follow up with additional testing as appropriate. If positive, Hep C is detected and the patient should either be linked to care through treatment or referral to a specialist.

aFor persons who might have been exposed to HCV within the past 6 months, consider re-testing for HCV antibodies or ordering an HCV RNA test. For persons who are immunocompromised, testing for HCV RNA can be considered.

bRepeat HCV RNA testing if the person tested is suspected to have had HCV exposure within the past 6 months or has clinical evidence of HCV disease.3

In a cohort of ~9,000 adults who tested positive for HCV antibodies from 2006-2008, 38% did not receive follow-up HCV RNA testing.7 Confirm diagnosis with an HCV RNA test3 and if confirmed initiate treatment or refer the patient to a specialist.

HCV Can Be Cured Patient Discussion Guides cover each step of the Hep C screening and diagnosing process to facilitate productive patient conversations

Download Patient Discussion Guides: Screen & Diagnose

These discussion guides cover each step of the screening and diagnosing process to facilitate productive patient conversations.

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