HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting progression of liver damage from Hep C occurring over time, from stage F0/F1 (no or mild fibrosis) to stage F4 (cirrhosis)Hep C: A progressive disease that may not have symptoms.
The longer patients go without treatment, the greater the direct impacts on their liver.1-3

Cure, or sustained virologic response (SVR12), is defined as undetectable levels of HCV in the blood at 12 weeks after completion of therapy.4,5

Direct impacts of Hep C.

Chronic liver disease in Hep C–infected persons usually progresses without any signs or symptoms for several decades.1

Hep C progresses to cause more severe liver damage over time:

Curing Hep C may abort progression of liver fibrosis in most, but not all, treated patients.4,6

HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting progression of liver damage from Hep C occurring over time, from stage F0/F1 (no or mild fibrosis) to stage F4 (cirrhosis)

F0/F1

NO OR MILD FIBROSIS

The liver has either no or minimal scarring (fibrosis)2,3

F2

MODERATE FIBROSIS

Scarring has occurred outside of the areas that include blood vessels2,3

F3

SEVERE / ADVANCED FIBROSIS

Liver scarring has spread and connects to other areas with scarring2,3

F4

CIRRHOSIS

Severe, advanced scarring of the liver (cirrhosis) has occurred2

Curing Hep C may abort progression of liver fibrosis in most, but not all, treated patients.4,6

Cirrhosis and liver cancer are impending threats to patients with untreated Hep C.

Development of Cirrhosis in Untreated Hep C Patients

In a 2010 analysis, ~45% OF UNTREATED HEP C PATIENTS were projected to develop cirrhosis by 20307

~45%OF UNTREATED HEP C PATIENTS were projected to develop cirrhosis by 20307

Hep C is a leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma.8

HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting that Hep C patients have up to 20 times increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma or liver cancerincreased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma9HCV Can Be Cured illustration depicting that approximately 34 percent of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma or liver cancer have Hep Cof patients with hepatocellular carcinoma are infected with Hep C9